Ground-Based Midcourse Defense System

Overview

The Missile Defense Agency’s Ground-Based Midcourse Defense System (GMD) is a key element of the Ballistic Missile Defense System. The GMD employs integrated communications networks, fire control systems, globally deployed sensors, and Ground-Based Interceptors (GBIs) that are capable of detecting, tracking and destroying ballistic missile threats. The GMD element of the Ballistic Missile Defense System provides Combatant Commanders the capability to engage and destroy intermediate- and long-range ballistic missile threats in space to protect the United States.

Our Role

Aerojet Rocketdyne supplies the liquid propellant Divert and Attitude Control System (DACS) that maneuvers the Raytheon-built EKV with the precision needed (often referred to as a “bullet hitting a bullet”) to successfully impact and destroy missile threats.

Alternate Propellant Tank (APT): Next generation design propellant tank for the EKV used on the GBI. This design update addressed producibility, material obsolescence, and cost related to the incumbent design.

Alternate Divert Thruster (ADT): Next generation divert thruster (main propulsion) for EKV used on the GBI. This design update addressed a platform stability and reliability concern as well as cost.

Key Features

The GBI is a multi-stage, solid fuel booster with an Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle (EKV) payload that uses hit-to-kill technology to destroy incoming intermediate- and long-range ballistic missile threats against the United States and its allies.

A Redesigned Kill Vehicle (RKV) is currently in development. Features include a modular design and improved cost, producibility, testability, maintainability, survivability, and reliability.

GBIs are currently deployed at Fort Greely, Alaska, and Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. A total of 44 interceptors have been emplaced.